devy wide receivers

Joe Milton

@DynastyPatrolHQ’s Devy Sleepers

I’m choosing to highlight my personal favorite fantasy football format today: The Devy Superflex League. If you’re unfamiliar, Devy is a step up from Dynasty formats in that you select college players including incoming freshmen. In my favorite league we have 14 managers and the Devy Draft each year is 10 rounds.  That means we’re drafting 140 new college players every year – exciting stuff!! Today I’m focusing on five under-the-radar Devy Superflex prospects that I think can make all the difference for your team.

Rashee Rice

Rashee Rice Devy Profile

As a three-star recruit coming out of Texas, Rashee Rice finally got his chance to be the WR1 at SMU. He was slated behind future NFL receiver Danny Gray. It is safe to say at this point that Rice seems to be the better of the two prospects. In his Junior season, Rice hauled in 64 catches for 670 yards and nine touchdowns. The stage was set for him to take on the WR1 role in 2022. In easily one of the most surprising starts of the season, the 6’2” 205 lbs. speedster caught 34 passes in four weeks. He is currently on pace for 90+ receptions, 1,400+ yards, and 10+ touchdowns.

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Did We Just Witness the Best WR room in College Football History?

Chris Olave, Garrett Wilson, and Jaxon Smith-Njigba combined for 3,600/4,952 (73%) of Ohio State’s team passing yards as well as 34/46 (74%) of total passing TDs. Chris Olave and Garrett Wilson have gone down as two of the best Buckeye receivers ever after going back-to-back in the NFL Draft at number 10 and 11 overall. Jaxon on the other hand, who was the most productive of the three, will be back in Columbus for his junior season where he’s been named a team captain and he’s one of the favorites to bring home the Biletnikoff Award. Let’s take a deeper look into each of these players and why we may have just witnessed the best WR room in the history of college football.

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Devy Players of the Week

In Week 5 of the NCAA season, Bijan Robinson won the Texas RB Battle. With 215 total yards and two touchdowns on 34 touches, Robinson led Texas past TCU to a 32-27 victory. TCU RB Zach Evans was no slouch, with 124 yards and a touchdown of his own, but it was not enough to pull the “Top Texas RB” title away from Bijan Robinson. 193 yards rushing is no joke, but what makes it even more impressive, is that on a whooping 32 carries he still averaged 6.0 YPC. Bijan Robinson had a truly gargantuan effort in Week 5. If he keeps this up, he could see himself hoisting the Heisman Trophy.

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Devy Players of the Week

Junior 6’1 215lb QB Malik Willis broke onto the scene last year, passing for 2,250 yards 20 touchdowns, and adding 944 yards and another 14 touchdowns on the ground. Willis is now off to a hot start in 2021, with 613 yards and seven touchdowns through the air, and 225 yards and four touchdowns on the ground. Willis is a true dual-threat QB, and he showed off his rushing ability against Old Dominion in Week 3. The Auburn transfer used his legs to find the endzone twice, rushing for 77 yards, and also throwing for 242 yards and four touchdowns, accounting for six touchdowns total. Willis has the attention of the Devy community thanks to his athleticism and rushing upside.

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Devy Players of the Week

Each week of the College Football season, I will be highlighting “Devy” players that excelled that particular week. I will touch on a QB, RB, and Pass Catcher (WR or TE) that performed well and deserve your attention. Sometimes these players will be established devy prospects, and other times they will be more under the radar. With Week 1 of the College Football season behind us, let’s dive right into it!

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 6

The Bearcats breakout quarterback is getting first-round hype for the NFL draft, and rightfully so. He provides a tantalizing combination of passing accuracy, completing 61% of his passes for 6,905 yards and 57 touchdowns with elite rushing abilities. This elite rushing ability is highlighted by his 391 college rushes that yielded 1,825 yards and 22 touchdowns. His 6’4” and 215 lbs. frame provide the prototypical NFL quarterback size to go along with his long speed, which is validated by his 4.55-second 40-yard dash spring testing time. He also can make defenders miss in space, as evident by his 4.0-seconds flat short shuttle time. Ridder is a player similar to Jalen Hurts, who will be a fringe first-round to the second-round draft selection, whose stock will skyrocket if given extended NFL starts by the franchise that drafts him.

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 5

The USC receiver also participates on the USC basketball team. Standing at 6’5” and 210 lbs. London has a skill set that allows him to succeed in both basketball and football at the division-one collegiate level. His 38” vertical leap along with his stiff, and ridged running style project him to be a solid big-slot receiver or tight end at the NFL level. His decent athleticism to go along with elite size yielded 72 catches for 1,069 yards and eight touchdowns during his USC career. With Amon-Ra St. Brown transitioning to the NFL, and Bru McCoy being released from the USC football program, London should be in line for a high target share in 2021 despite his DeVonta Smith BMI levels.

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 4

Justin Hall is the most productive FCS receiver of all time, having hauled in 257 passes for 2,772 yards and 13 touchdowns also adds peripheral production in the rushing game. It is clear why Ball State focused on feeding Hall throughout his career. The 5’9” and 186 lbs. super senior is known for his insane strength. Along with being very productive through the air and ground, Hall tested very well this Spring with a 500 lbs. back squat and a 305 lbs. power clean. Because he plays in the FCS, he is not eligible for Campus to Canton leagues, but remember the name when the NFL Combine for 2022 rolls around.

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 3

The most electric-skill position player in the FCS is Sam Houston’s 5’9” and 192 lbs. wide receiver and kick returner Ezzard. He dominated Sam Houston’s competition over his career averaging 27 yards per reception and 18 yards per return. He wins with his dynamic burst, testing out of this world in spring ball with a 4.28-second 40-yard dash and a 45.5” vertical leap. Ezzard is a big play waiting to happen, and with his frame, he could transition into an NFL slot receiver and difference-maker on special teams. His addition in the special teams game may garner day-two draft capital, though the non-savvy dynasty players may take this to believe that draft capital is an indication of early offensive success.

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 2

This year we will be counting down the most athletic players from the least likely to make an impact in the NFL to the most likely. In doing this we are going to combine the players’ athletic traits, production profiles, and competition levels to highlight undervalued devy assets as well as players to keep an eye on for late breakouts. In this article, we will start with the uber-athletic athletes that do not have the production that indicates NFL Draft capital. Let’s dive into the higher-end devy dark horses!

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The Freakiest Athletes in College Football for 2021: Part 1

This year we will be counting down the most athletic players from the least likely to make an impact in the NFL to the most likely. In doing this we are going to combine the players’ athletic traits, production profiles, and competition levels to highlight undervalued devy assets as well as players to keep an eye on for late breakouts. We will start with the uber-athletic prospects that do not have the production to indicate NFL Draft capital. Let’s dive into the devy dart throws!

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