Devy Football Factory

Should you consider Nick Chubb with the 1.01?

Somewhere in the Multiverse exists a reality where on October 10TH 2015, Nick Chubb cuts it out to the left sideline and his knee doesn’t hyperextend in one of the most gruesome knee injuries you’ll ever see. Chubb’s streak of 14 consecutive games over 100 rushing yards then continues into the future(in contrast, the Kalen Ballage hype boys should note that he has only had four 100 yard rushing games in his college career). Nick Chubb is then either the 1.01 in 2017 over Leonard Fournette, or he stays for his senior season and this year we have Nick Chubb, Derrius Guice and Saquon Barkley creating the RB trinity.

Coming out of Cedartown High School in Georgia, Nick Chubb posted a legit SPARQ Gawd rating of 143.91 that included a 4.47 40-Yard Dash at 5-11 217-pounds and a vertical jump of 40.8 inches. While in high school, Chubb won the state championship with a 12lb Shot Put of 55’ and had Personal Records of 10.69-seconds in the 100 Meters and 21.83-seconds in the 200 Meters. He placed no worse than 5TH in his races his senior season, during regional and championship meets. Chubb was a beast on the football field, posting 101 touchdowns in his high school career before heading to Georgia as a top five positional recruit.

Oh, did I mention that Nick Chubb set the power clean record in Georgia with a lift of 395-pounds in high school? He also posted a squat of 645-pounds and a max bench press of 390-pounds.

Chubb started off as a freshman in 2014, taking over for the injured Todd Gurley and set the world on fire. He posted 1547 rushing yards on 219 carries with 14 rushing touchdowns. For the “Nick Chubb can’t catch” crowd, he also posted 18 receptions for 213 receiving yards that year. He never posted significant receiving yards, but he is not a liability as a pass catcher. Chubb injured his knee his sophomore season tearing most major ligaments and damage to his cartilage but his ACL went uninjured. The injury cut him one game short of tying Herschel Walker’s record of consecutive 100-yard rushing games. Chubb came back for his Junior and Senior years where he finished with the second most rushing yards of all time and was 2ND in total rushing TDs for the Bulldogs.

According to ProFootballFocus advanced stats and their Elusive Rating, which looks at missed tackles either from jukes or trucking a defender and yards gained after contact, Nick Chubb was 4TH overall in Elusive Rating in the 2018 Draft Class, over Sony Michel, Ronald Jones II, and the consensus RB1 Saquon Barkley.

Thanks to all the folks cutting up game tape, I sat down and watched everything I could on Nick Chubb. I came away with this impression: If not for that knee injury Nick Chubb would be right there for the 1.01 and the RB1 in both fantasy and real football.

Chubb is a freight train thundering through the line and has no time for attempted arm tackles. This is a player who is the rare combination of size, speed, explosiveness, agility, vision and the attitude to run over defenders. Very few players are natural runners on the level of Nick Chubb. He sets up his runs and attacks defenders by making them change or abandon their angle of attack as they come in for the tackle. He is a Yards After Contact monster that can truck three defenders and still hit a 40-yard touchdown over your defense. Chubb’s strong legs and low center of gravity give him uncanny balance, allowing him to keep his feet moving and shrug off or slip defenders after contact. 2017 saw a return to form of that dominant freshman year running back, and that will only continue to climb as he works with NFL trainers.

It’s no secret that everyone wants the three-down bell cow back on their fantasy teams. That David Johnson, Le’Veon Bell or Todd Gurley who posts monster RB numbers, while adding in dynamic pass-catching production. Nick Chubb isn’t Alvin Kamara or Christian McCaffrey in the passing game, but he isn’t D’Onta Foreman either. Chubb needs to work on his pass pro technique. It isn’t a willingness issue at hand but simply refining his technique to keep his QB clean so that Chubb can get more work on passing downs when he isn’t an option on a check-down or quick throw.

Nick Chubb is already working his way back to form after that gruesome injury in 2015. You can already see him squatting 600-pounds and power cleaning 390-pounds again. Watch him drag defenders grabbing at the injured leg as he powers over them in 2017 and look forward to big things in 2018.

Right now, it is easy to see why Saquon Barkley is the RB1. Health and his role in the passing game are exactly what everyone wants to see out of a potential #1 fantasy running back. Derrius Guice dealt with injuries himself last year, nothing as bad as Chubb, though his massive 2016 and clean health still put him just a tick over Chubb. For me, the NFL Combine will be huge for Nick Chubb. Going into Indianapolis and posting impressive agility numbers and a clean bill of health would be major plus heading into the NFL Draft.

If you want the next big-time running back, it’s Nick Chubb. On the key play to tie the game, Georgia kept their true RB1 in the backfield and Nick Chubb ran the ball in for the TD to tie the game with Oklahoma. If you can’t move up to get Barkley in your rookie drafts this year, make a move for the 1.03 and get yourself some Chubb.

petelaw

FF Shaman | Fantasy Football writer on http://PlayerProfiler.com | #DEVY writer @DFF_Devy & @DFF_Dynasty #DevyWatch #DynastyFootball | Marine Veteran | ??⚓️ @_PeteLaw

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3 Comments

    • dhs2

      March 24, 2018

      How do you feel about Chubb now after his Combine numbers?

      Reply
      • dhs2

        March 24, 2018

        By the way, I have the 1.03 and 1.10 in the first round of my dynasty league’s rookie draft.

        Reply
      • Shane Manila

        March 24, 2018

        Only bolstered everyone’s opinion on him. His agility drills, and combine numbers on a whole showed he is if not fully back from his knee injury then damn near it.

        Reply

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